Repair Theory - Tria Vue

INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN LEARNING THEORY


Repair Theory

The theory is trying to explain how people learn procedural skills with a focus to how we make mistakes. When a task cannot be complete and cannot move on further the individual applies different strategies to solve it. The strategies (meta-actions) used are called repairs. Some of these repairs (strategies) will have a correct outcome but can also be incorrect. The theory began from a study of children solving arithmetic problems called the “buggy” studies of Brown and Burton in 1978. The study found different types of bugs which are small misconceptions that cause systematic errors. This study resulted to the procedural problem solving called Repair Theory.

We use it to solve problems and find strategies to correct them, it applies to any procedural applications. We can apply any repair we can think of. For example when we are solving two digit arithmetic problems, it is easy to borrow from the tens place. We cannot just borrow from the 10's place and need a new rule by making it 'always borrow left adjacent'. For three digit, we must now create a new rule for borrowing from the left column. The left-most (farthest left) and left column are different creating an impasse. Thus the repair theory is that problem should be chosen to eliminate what was likely to cause the bugs and resolving the impasse.


REFERENCES

Repair Theory . (2013, January 1). . Retrieved July 17, 2014, from http://www.instructionaldesign.org/theories/repair-theory.html

VanLehn, K. (1983, January 1). HUMAN PROCEDURAL SKILL ACQUISITION: THEORY, MODEL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL VALIDATION. Retrieved July 18, 2014, from http://www.aaai.org/Papers/AAAI/1983/AAAI83-055.pdf

VanLehn, K., & Brown, J. S. Repair theory: A generative theory of bugs in procedural skills. Cognitive science, 4, 379-426. Retrieved July 18, 2014, from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1207/s15516709cog0404_3/abstract

VanLehn, K. (1990). The Representation of Procedural Knowledge. Mind Bugs: The Origins of Procedural Misconceptions (). Massachusettes: MIT Press.


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